VICI project

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VICI project

This was a 5-year project that ran from May 2004 till May 2009. It was supported by the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO), the Centre for Cognition (formerly called the Nijmegen Institute for Cognition and Information) and the Centre for Cognitive Neuroimaging (formerly called the F. C. Donders Centre for Cognitive Neuroimaging) of the Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour at Radboud University Nijmegen, and (for the first two years) the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics (MPI). The project used response time, eye tracking, electrophysiological (i.e., ERP), hemodynamic neuroimaging (i.e., fMRI), molecular genetic, and computational modeling techniques to study human attentional control, with special reference to language performance.

 

Aim

The project addressed the question: Given a goal and the motivation to reach it, what attentional mechanisms enable accurate and speeded responses? Attentional mechanisms in goal-directed responding have perhaps been most intensively studied in the past by bringing people in situations where they had to resist temptation, thereby exploiting what is expressed by a famous quotation of Oscar Wilde (1893):

In general, humans are good but not perfect at resisting temptation. As Donders observed in the late nineteenth century, distraction may lead to delays in responding and this can be exploited by using mental chronometry in examining attentional control, as later research has done.

Although issues of attention and control were explored in the early days of experimental psychology (in the late 1800s by F.C. Donders, James McKeen Cattell, and Wilhelm Wundt), no progress was made in understanding the mechanisms of control. Associationist and behaviorist theories accounted for action selection by postulating associations between stimuli and responses (e.g., John Watson, Burrhus Skinner). However, if all our actions were determined exclusively by stimulus-response associations, goals could not determine which action to make because the strongest association would automatically determine the response. In the early 1900s, a group of psychologists at Würzburg University (Henry Watt, Narziss Ach, Oswald Külpe) demonstrated the importance of the task ("Aufgabe") in determining a response. However, how exactly task goals directed processing remained unclear.

In the 1910s, Georg Müller argued that goals and instructions associatively bias the activation of one response rather than another. In line with this idea, the currently dominant view in the attention and performance literature holds that attention associatively biases or "sculpts" the activation of goal-relevant responses. According to another view, originating with Otto Selz in the 1910s, goal-directed responding emerges from symbolic condition-action rules making explicit reference to goals. When a goal is placed in working memory, attention is focused on those condition-action rules that include this goal among their conditions. Attentional control arises from condition-action rules referring to the goal. The idea of goal-referenced control thrived in the work of Adriaan de Groot, Allen Newell, Herbert Simon, and John Anderson, among others, on high-level cognitive processes like problem solving, i.e., playing chess, proving logic theorems, and solving puzzles such as the Tower of Hanoi (video clip of Herbert Simon, in which he explains that resisting temptation plays an important role even in solving the Tower of Hanoi puzzle). Associative models generally failed on these high-level cognitive processes. However, due to the traditional partitioning of experimental psychology into cognition, perception, and action, with little communication across the boundaries, goal-referenced control models have had little impact in the perception-action literature until recently.

The success of the view of goal-referenced control in addressing classic issues from the attention and performance literature (e.g., the success of the WEAVER++ model on Stroop-like tasks) suggested, however, that we need to revise our ideas on attention. The aim of the VICI project was to develop and further validate the view of goal-referenced control by testing it against the dominant view in three classic action domains involving attentional control: responding to stimuli that afford multiple tasks, switching between tasks, and dual-task performance. The research aimed to compare verbal and nonverbal performance on highly similar tasks. Thereby, it used novel combinations of empirical tools for studying the relations among attentional control, the human brain in action, genetic variation, verbal and nonverbal behavior, and movements of one of the primary perceptual organs for selective attention, the eyes. Moreover, these tools were combined with the powerful theoretical tool of computational modeling, to attempt to simulate fine-grained response time, eye movement, and neuroimaging data on verbal and nonverbal actions within a single, theoretical framework.

There were four subprojects, three of which involved the empirical study of an aspect of goal-directed control: Eye movements in the attentional control of verbal and nonverbal actions, Attentional control of verbal actions in bilingual speakers, and Neural correlates of the attentional control of verbal and nonverbal actions. The fourth subproject, Computational modeling of attentional control, involved computational analyses of the data obtained in the other subprojects. The first three subprojects were PhD projects and the fourth subproject was conducted by the principal investigator. The project started at 1. May 2004. The PhD projects started 1. September 2004.

 

People

The following people were associated with the VICI project:

Martijn Lamers, PhD student conducting the subproject "Eye movements in the attentional control of verbal and nonverbal actions" (September 2004 - May 2009). The subproject used response time and eyetracking techniques to study levels of selective attention in performing verbal and nonverbal actions. The examinations included a paradoxical duration effect in Stroop task performance, the "Gratton effect" in Eriksen en Stroop task performance (this study proposed and computationally implemented a new two-factor account), response set effects, and the control of gaze in dual-task and go/no-go performance. Martijn defended his doctoral dissertation Levels of selective attention in action planning on March 11, 2011.

Kim Verhoef, PhD student conducting the subproject "Attentional control of verbal actions in bilingual speakers" (September 2004 - July 2008). The subproject used response time and electrophysiological (i.e., ERP) measures in studying the attentional control over languages in bilinguals. The research was conducted in collaboration with Dorothee Chwilla (Centre for Cognition of the Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour). Kim defended her doctoral dissertation Electrophysiology of language switching in bilingual speakers on October 22, 2008.

Esther Aarts [Esther's personal website], PhD student conducting the subproject "Neural correlates of the attentional control of verbal and nonverbal actions" (September 2004 - October 2008). The subproject used hemodynamic neuroimaging (i.e., fMRI) and techniques in assessing the basis of attentional control in the human brain. Moreover, genetic imaging was used to map brain activity derived during attentional control onto genetic variation. The research was conducted in collaboration with Miranda van Turennout (May 2004 - October 2007) and Roshan Cools (November 2007 - October 2008) at the Centre for Cognitive Neuroimaging of the Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour. In November 2008, Esther received a Stensen postdoctoral grant (one of the two awarded in the cognitive neurosciences in 2008) to investigate "The role of catecholamines in attentional control" at the University of California at Berkeley, USA. She also received a Human Brain Mapping 2009 travel award for the presentation "Parsing the role of dopamine in human reward and its cognitive consequences using genetic imaging". Esther defended her doctoral dissertation Resisting temptation: The role of the anterior cingulate cortex in adjusting cognitive control on September 9, 2009.

Lonneke Bücken, BA student (January 2007 - June 2007). BA thesis "De effecten van intrinsieke taalinformatie op woord- en plaatjesbenoeming" [The effects of intrinsic language information on word and picture naming].

Piotr Quee, research assistant (August 2004 - January 2006).

Jos Olders, research assistant (April 2005 - April 2006).

Willemijn Schot, research assistant (February 2006 - September 2006).

Marianne Severens, research assistant (October 2006 - July 2008).

Hannah Ferentzi, research assistant (January 2009 - May 2009).

Jil Humann, research assistant (January 2009 - May 2009).

Ardi Roelofs, principal investigator, subproject "Computational modeling of attentional control" (May 2004 - May 2009).

 

Principal investigator and PhD students of the VICI project. From left to right: Ardi Roelofs, Kim Verhoef, Esther Aarts, and Martijn Lamers.

   

Place

The VICI research was conducted at Radboud University Nijmegen within the setting of the Centre for Cognition (formerly called the Nijmegen Institute for Cognition and Information) and the Centre for Cognitive Neuroimaging (formerly called the F. C. Donders Centre for Cognitive Neuroimaging) of the Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, and the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics. At the time, the Nijmegen research in cognitive neuroscience had three forefronts corresponding to the main aspects of the VICI research: psycholinguistics, action and perception, and the neural basis of cognition. This structure was also expressed at that time by the three specializations of the international Master's programme in Cognitive Neuroscience of Radboud University. The research setting included internationally renowned experts, who were regularly consulted.

 

VICI members engaged in a game of poker. Photo made on the occasion of Miranda van Turennout's farewell to academia to pursue a new career in the field of criminal law.

 

 

Publications & Presentations

(These are for the VICI project only. For other related publications, click here)

 

Publications

 

 

 

 2004

Roelofs, A. (2004). The seduced speaker: Modeling of cognitive control. Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence, 3123, 1-10. Article (PDF 128K)

 2005

Roelofs, A. (2005). The visual-auditory color-word Stroop asymmetry and its time course. Memory & Cognition, 33, 1325-1336. Article (PDF 253K)

 2006

Roelofs, A. (2006). Context effects of pictures and words in naming objects, reading words, and generating simple phrases. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 59, 1764-1784. Article (PDF 172K)

 

Roelofs, A., & Verhoef, K. (2006). Modeling the control of phonological encoding in bilingual speakers. Bilingualism: Language and Cognition, 9, 167-176. Article (PDF 108K)

 

Roelofs, A., Van Turennout, M., & Coles, M. G. H. (2006). Anterior cingulate cortex activity can be independent of response conflict in Stroop-like tasks. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA, 103, 13884-13889. Article (PDF 350K)

2007

Lamers, M., & Roelofs, A. (2007). Role of Gestalt grouping in selective attention: Evidence from the Stroop task. Perception & Psychophysics, 69, 1305-1314. Article (PDF 261K)

 

Roelofs, A. (2007). Attention and gaze control in picture naming, word reading, and word categorizing. Journal of Memory and Language, 57, 232-251. Article (PDF 311K)

 

Roelofs, A. (2007). A critique of simple name-retrieval models of spoken word planning. Language and Cognitive Processes, 22, 1237-1260. Article (PDF 173K)

 

Roelofs, A. (2007). On the modelling of spoken word planning: Rejoinder to La Heij, Starreveld, and Kuipers (2007). Language and Cognitive Processes, 22, 1281-1286. Article (PDF 60K)

 

Roelofs, A., & Lamers, M. (2007). Modelling the control of visual attention in Stroop-like tasks. In A. S. Meyer, L. R. Wheeldon, and A. Krott (Eds.), Automaticity and control in language processing (pp. 123-142). Hove, UK: Psychology Press. Article (PDF 232K)

2008

Aarts, E., Roelofs, A., & Van Turennout, M. (2008). Anticipatory activity in anterior cingulate cortex can be independent of conflict and error likelihood. Journal of Neuroscience, 28, 4671-4678. Article (PDF 189K)

 

Roelofs, A. (2008). Tracing attention and the activation flow in spoken word planning using eye movements. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 34, 353-368. Article (PDF 285K)

 

Roelofs, A. (2008). Attention to spoken word planning: Chronometric and neuroimaging evidence. Language and Linguistics Compass, 2, 389-405. Article (PDF 327K)

 

Roelofs, A. (2008). Dynamics of the attentional control of word retrieval: Analyses of response time distributions. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 137, 303-323. Article (PDF 392K)

 

Roelofs, A. (2008). Attention, gaze shifting, and dual-task interference from phonological encoding in spoken word planning. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 34, 1580-1598. Article (PDF 377K)

 

Verhoef, K. (2008). Electrophysiology of language switching in bilingual speakers. Doctoral dissertation, Radboud University Nijmegen.

 

 

2009

Aarts, E. (2009). Resisting temptation: The role of the anterior cingulate cortex in adjusting cognitive control. Doctoral dissertation, Radboud University Nijmegen.

 

 

Aarts, E., Roelofs, A., & Van Turennout, M. (2009). Attentional control of task and response in lateral and medial frontal cortex: Brain activity and reaction time distributions. Neuropsychologia, 47, 2089-2099. Article (PDF 707K)

 

Verhoef, K., Roelofs, A., & Chwilla, D. (2009). Role of inhibition in language switching: Evidence from event-related brain potentials in overt picture naming. Cognition, 110, 84-99. Article (PDF 721K)

2010

Aarts, E., Roelofs, A., Franke, B., Rijpkema, M., Fernandez, G., Helmich, R., & Cools, R. (2010). Striatal dopamine mediates the interface between motivational and cognitive control in humans: Evidence from genetic imaging. Neuropsychopharmacology, 35, 1943-1951. Article (PDF 491K)

  Lamers, M., Roelofs, A., & Rabeling-Keus, I. (2010). Selective attention and response set in the Stroop task. Memory & Cognition, 38, 893-904. Article (PDF 346K)
  Roelofs, A. (2010). Attention, temporal predictability, and the time course of context effects in naming performance. Acta Psychologica, 133, 146-153. Article (PDF 267K)
 

Roelofs, A. (2010). Attention and facilitation: Converging information versus inadvertent reading in Stroop task performance. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 36, 411-422. Article (PDF 858K)

 

Verhoef, K., Roelofs, A., & Chwilla, D. (2010). Electrophysiological evidence for endogenous control in switching attention between languages in overt picture naming. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 22, 1832-1843. Article (PDF 282K)

2011 Aarts, E., & Roelofs, A. (2011). Attentional control in anterior cingulate cortex based on probabilistic cueing. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 23, 716-727. Article (PDF 419K)
 

Lamers, M. (2011). Levels of selective attention in action planning. Doctoral dissertation, Radboud University Nijmegen.

 

  Lamers, M., & Roelofs, A. (2011). Attentional control adjustments in Stroop and Eriksen task performance can be independent of response conflict. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 64, 1056-1081. Article (PDF 441K)
  Lamers, M., & Roelofs, A. (2011). Attention and gaze shifting in dual-task and go/no-go performance with vocal responding. Acta Psychologica, 137, 261-268. Article (PDF 267K)
  Roelofs, A. (2011). Attention, exposure duration, and gaze shifting in naming performance. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 37, 860-873. Article (PDF 525K)
  Roelofs, A. (2011). Modeling the attentional control of vocal utterances: From Wernicke to WEAVER++. In J. Guendouzi, F. Loncke, & M. J. Williams (Eds.), The Handbook of Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Processes: Perspectives in Communication Disorders (pp. 189-207). Hove, UK: Psychology Press. Article (PDF 1464K)
2012 Roelofs, A. (2012). Attention, spatial integration, and the tail of response time distributions in Stroop task performance. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 65, 135-150. Article (PDF 238K)

 

 

Presentations

 

 

 

 2004

Roelofs, A. [talk] De verleide spreker [The seduced speaker]. Studium Generale series on cognitive science, Leiden University, The Netherlands, (more information in Dutch).

 

Roelofs, A. [talk] The seduced speaker. Department of Experimental Psychology, Gent University, Gent, Belgium.

 

Roelofs, A. [talk] The seduced speaker: Modeling of cognitive control [keynote lecture]. Third International Conference on Natural Language Generation (INLG04), Brockenhurst, New Forest, England.

 

Roelofs, A. [talk] Control of spoken word production by dyslexic and nondyslexic readers. Conference of the Dutch Society for Neuropsychology, Doorwerth, the Netherlands.

 

Roelofs, A. [talk] The language user as Ben-Hur: Modeling the hemodynamics of control. Brain Science Event (Koninklijke Nederlandse Akademie van Wetenschappen / Royal Society of Edinburgh), Amsterdam, the Netherlands.

 

Roelofs, A. [talk] What determines the direction of our thoughts and actions? NICI Lecture, Radboud University Nijmegen, the Netherlands.

 

Roelofs, A. [talk] How do we keep our minds on track? Graduate student research day, Nijmegen Institute for Cognition and Information, Radboud University Nijmegen, the Netherlands.

 

Roelofs, A., Van Turennout, M., & Coles, M. [talk] Anterior cingulate cortex executes control rather than detects conflict. Seminar on the neuroscience of cognitive control, University of Gent, Gent, Belgium.

2005

Aarts, E., Roelofs, A., & Van Turennout, M. [talk] Divide and conquer? Role of anterior cingulate and lateral prefrontal cortex in cognitive control. Brown-Bag-Meeting, F.C. Donders Centre for Cognitive Neuroimaging, Nijmegen, the Netherlands.

 

Aarts, E., Lamers, M., Verhoef, K., & Roelofs, A. [poster] The reverse Stroop effect in switching between color naming and word reading. XIVth Conference of the European Society for Cognitive Psychology, Leiden, the Netherlands.

 

Aarts, E, Roelofs, A. & Van Turennout, M. [talk] Response and task conflicts in medial and lateral prefrontal areas. 10th Wintercongres van de Nederlandse Vereniging voor Psychonomie [10th Winter conference of the Dutch Psychonomic Society]. Egmond aan Zee, the Netherlands.

 

Lamers, M. & Roelofs, A. [talk] Role of Gestalt grouping principles in visual attention: Evidence from the Stroop task. 10th Wintercongres van de Nederlandse Vereniging voor Psychonomie [10th Winter conference of the Dutch Psychonomic Society]. Egmond aan Zee, the Netherlands.

 

Roelofs, A. [talk] What determines the direction of our thoughts and actions? Department of Psychology, University of Wrzburg, Germany.

 

Roelofs, A. [talk] What determines the direction of our thoughts and actions? Behavioural Brain Sciences Centre, School of Psychology, University of Birmingham, UK.

 

Roelofs, A. [talk] How do speakers control the planning of words? Department of Language and Speech, Radboud University Nijmegen.

 

Roelofs, A. [talk] Hoe zoeken we doelgericht naar woorden en begrippen in ons geheugen? [How do we direct our search for words and concepts in memory?] Symposium van de Utrechtse studievereniging voor Cognitieve Kunstmatige Intelligentie over "What's on your mind? A Symposium on concepts, consciousness and cognition".

 

Roelofs, A. [talk]. Cascading of activation in planning the production of spoken words. Second International Workshop on Language Production, U. Maastricht, the Netherlands.

 

Roelofs, A. [talk]. The role of response modality in Stroop-like tasks. XIVth Conference of the European Society for Cognitive Psychology, Leiden, the Netherlands.

 

Roelofs, A. [talk] Dual-task interference from phoneme selection in picture naming. 10th Wintercongres van de Nederlandse Vereniging voor Psychonomie [10th Winter conference of the Dutch Psychonomic Society]. Egmond aan Zee, the Netherlands.

 

Verhoef, K., Roelofs, A., & Chwilla, D. [poster]. Control over languages by bilinguals: Evidence from cued language switching in picture naming. Second International Workshop on Language Production, U. Maastricht, the Netherlands.

 

Verhoef, K., Roelofs, A. & Chwilla, D. [talk] Language switching in bilingual speakers: Evidence from language-cued picture naming. 10th Wintercongres van de Nederlandse Vereniging voor Psychonomie [10th Winter conference of the Dutch Psychonomic Society]. Egmond aan Zee, the Netherlands.

2006

Aarts, E. [talk]. The role of the anterior cingulate cortex in cognitive control. Brown-Bag-Meeting, F. C. Donders Centre for Cognitive Neuroimaging, Nijmegen.

 

Aarts, E, Roelofs, A., & Van Turennout, M. [poster] Neural correlates of endogenous and exogenous control in task switching. 13th annual Cognitive Neuroscience Society (CNS) meeting, San Francisco, California, USA.

 

Aarts, E, Roelofs, A., & Van Turennout, M. [poster] Role of medial frontal cortex in endogenous and exogenous control in task switching. Workshop on "Errors, conflicts, and rewards: The role of medial frontal cortex in cognitive control and performance monitoring", Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

 

Lamers, M, & Roelofs, A. [talk] Interplay of Gestalt grouping principles, attention for action, and eye movements. Joint EPS-NVP (British-Dutch psychonomics) conference, Birmingham, UK.

 

Roelofs, A. [talk] Functional decomposition of word production and its control. College de France, Paris. Announcement

 

Verhoef, K., Roelofs, A., & Chwilla, D. [poster] Dynamics of language switching: Evidence from event-related potentials in overt picture naming. 13th annual Cognitive Neuroscience Society (CNS) meeting, San Francisco, California, USA.

 

Verhoef, K., Roelofs, A., & Chwilla, D. [poster] Dynamics of language switching: Evidence from event-related potentials in overt picture naming. NWO/Radboud University workshop on "Linguistic and psycholinguistic approaches to code-switching and language switching", Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

 

Verhoef, K., Roelofs, A., & Chwilla, D. [talk] Dynamics of language switching: Evidence from event-related potentials in overt picture naming. Architectures and Mechanisms of Language Processing (AMLaP 2006) conference, Nijmegen, the Netherlands.

2007

Aarts, E. [poster]. Symbolically driven preparatory adjustments in cognitive control by anterior cingulate cortex. Dutch Endo-Neuro-Psycho meeting 2007, Doorwerth, the Netherlands

 

Aarts, E. [talk]. The role of the anterior cingulate cortex in cognitive control. The open day of the F.C. Donders Centre 2007, Nijmegen, the Netherlands.

 

Aarts, E. [talk]. The role of the anterior cingulate cortex in cognitive control. ACACia labmeeting UvA, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.

 

Aarts, E., Roelofs, A., & Van Turennout, M. [poster]. Symbolically driven preparatory adjustments in cognitive control by anterior cingulate cortex. 14th annual Cognitive Neuroscience Society (CNS) meeting, New York, USA.

 

Aarts, E., & Roelofs, A. [talk]. Adjustments in attentional control by congruent information in anterior cingulate cortex. 11th Wintercongres van de Nederlandse Vereniging voor Psychonomie [11th Winter conference of the Dutch Psychonomic Society]. Egmond aan Zee, the Netherlands.

 

Lamers, M., & Roelofs, A. [poster] Sequential adjustments in task performance: Widening of attention following congruency. Rovereto Attention Workshop on "Attentional processing and control", Rovereto, Italy.

 

Lamers, M., & Roelofs, A. [talk] Sequential effects in the Eriksen and Stroop tasks: Widening or narrowing of attention? 11th Wintercongres van de Nederlandse Vereniging voor Psychonomie [11th Winter conference of the Dutch Psychonomic Society]. Egmond aan Zee, the Netherlands.

 

Roelofs, A. [talk]. Attention, gaze shifting, and dual-task interference from word planning. XVth Conference of the European Society for Cognitive Psychology, Marseille, France.

 

Roelofs, A. [talk]. Dynamics of the control of word retrieval revealed through distributional analyses. 11th Wintercongres van de Nederlandse Vereniging voor Psychonomie [11th Winter conference of the Dutch Psychonomic Society]. Egmond aan Zee, the Netherlands.

 

Verhoef, K., Roelofs, A., & Chwilla, D. [poster]. Electrophysiological evidence for endogenous control in switching between languages in overt picture naming. 14th annual Cognitive Neuroscience Society (CNS) meeting, New York, USA.

 

Verhoef, K., Roelofs, A., & Chwilla, D. [talk]. Electrophysiological evidence for endogenous control of language switching in overt picture naming. XVth Conference of the European Society for Cognitive Psychology, Marseille, France.

 

Verhoef, K., Roelofs, A. & Chwilla, D. [talk] Electrophysiological evidence for endogenous control of language switching in overt picture naming. 11th Wintercongres van de Nederlandse Vereniging voor Psychonomie [11th Winter conference of the Dutch Psychonomic Society]. Egmond aan Zee, the Netherlands.

2008

Aarts, E. [talk]. Role of dopamine in cognitive control. Joint lab meeting of the VICI group and the research groups of Richard Ridderinkhof (ACACia, University of Amsterdam), Eveline Crone (Brain & Development Lab, University of Leiden), and Roshan Cools (Cognitive Control lab, Centre for Cognitive Neuroimaging of the Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Nijmegen).

 

Aarts, E. [talk]. Cue-based adjustments in cognitive control. D'Esposito lab, University of California, Berkeley, USA.

 

Aarts, E. [talk]. The role of the anterior cingulate cortex in cognitive control. 24th NICI juniorendag [Graduate student research day], Nijmegen Institute for Cognition and Information, Radboud University Nijmegen, the Netherlands.

 

Aarts, E. [talk]. Role of the anterior cingulate cortex in cue-based adjustments in control. Donders Discussions 2008: A conference for PhD students in cognitive neuroscience, Nijmegen.

 

Aarts, E., & Roelofs, A. [poster]. Adjustments in attentional control by congruent information in anterior cingulate cortex. 15th annual Cognitive Neuroscience Society (CNS) meeting, San Francisco, USA.

 

Aarts, E., & Roelofs, A. [poster]. Adjustments in attentional control by congruent information in anterior cingulate cortex. Workshop on "The attentive speaker: Neuroimaging, eyetracking, genetics, deficits, and modeling", Nijmegen, the Netherlands.

 

Lamers, M., & Roelofs, A. [talk] Sequential adjustments in Eriksen flanker and Stroop task performance: Widening of attention following congruency. Workshop on "Action monitoring and behavioural adjustment", Aachen, Germany.

 

Lamers, M., & Roelofs, A. [poster]. Sequential adjustments in Eriksen flanker and Stroop task performance: Attentional widening, narrowing, or repetition priming? Workshop on "The attentive speaker: Neuroimaging, eyetracking, genetics, deficits, and modeling". Nijmegen, the Netherlands.

 

Lamers, M., & Roelofs, A. [poster]. Paradoxical duration effects in the Stroop task: Selective attention in Gestalt grouping. Dag van de perceptie 2008 [Day of perception], TNO, Soesterberg, The Netherlands.

 

Roelofs, A. [talk] From monkey calls to human words: Role of anterior cingulate cortex in attention to action. Department of Psychonomics, University of Amsterdam.

 

Roelofs, A. [talk]. From monkey calls to human words: Role of anterior cingulate cortex in attention to action. Brown-Bag-Meeting, F.C. Donders Centre for Cognitive Neuroimaging, Nijmegen, the Netherlands.

 

Roelofs, A. [talk] From monkey calls to human words: Role of anterior cingulate cortex in attention to action. Workshop on "The attentive speaker: Neuroimaging, eyetracking, genetics, deficits, and modeling", Nijmegen, the Netherlands.

 

Roelofs, A. [talk]. Attention and word planning: Response time distributions, brain activity, and genetic influences. Language and Cognition Group (LACG), Leiden University, the Netherlands.

 

Verhoef, K. "Electrophysiology of language switching in bilingual speakers". Defense doctoral dissertation, Radboud University Nijmegen.

 

Verhoef, K., Roelofs, A., & Chwilla, D. [poster]. Electrophysiological investigations of endogenous and exogenous contributions to language switch costs in overt picture naming. 15th annual Cognitive Neuroscience Society (CNS) meeting, San Francisco, USA.

 

Verhoef, K., Roelofs, A., & Chwilla, D. [poster]. Electrophysiological investigations of endogenous and exogenous contributions to language switch costs in overt picture naming. Workshop on "The attentive speaker: Neuroimaging, eyetracking, genetics, deficits, and modeling", Nijmegen, the Netherlands.

 

 

 

 

 

2009

Aarts, E., Roelofs, A., Helmich, R., Franke, B., Rijpkema, M., Fernandez, G., & Cools, R. [talk] Parsing the role of dopamine in human reward and its cognitive consequences using genetic imaging. Endo-Neuro-Psycho meeting, Doorwerth, The Netherlands.

 

Aarts, E., Roelofs, A., Helmich, R., Franke, B., Rijpkema, M., Fernandez, G., & Cools, R. [talk + poster] Parsing the role of dopamine in human reward and its cognitive consequences using genetic imaging. Human Brain Mapping meeting, San Francisco, USA.

 

Lamers, M. [talks]. School lectures on "Hoe controleren we onze aandacht?" [How do we control our attention?] and "Controle van aandacht in het brein (I can resist everything except temptation)" [Control of attention in the brain (I can resist everything except temptation)] at high school Hendrik Pierson, Zetten, The Netherlands.

  Lamers, M., Roelofs, A., & Rabeling-Keus, I. [talk]. Cue-induced early versus late attention in the Stroop task. Dag van de Perceptie [Day of Perception], TNO Human Factors, Soesterberg, The Netherlands.

 

 

Teaching

 

 

 

2004

Roelofs, A. From Aufgabe to action: Modeling of executive control. Summer school of the German Research Society (DFG) on "Executive functions", Günne, Germany.

 

Roelofs, A. "Perception and action: An integrative approach". Brain and Behavior B: Neurophysiology course lecture. Radboud University Nijmegen.

2005

Roelofs, A. Undergraduate practical in cognitive psychology: Motor behavior. Radboud University Nijmegen.

 

Roelofs, A. "Cumulative computational modeling in cognitive psychology". Validity of Cognitive Models course lecture. Radboud University Nijmegen.

 

Roelofs, A. "Neural correlates of cognitive control". Brain and Behavior B: Neurophysiology course lecture. Radboud University Nijmegen.

2006

Roelofs, A. "Language 1: Perception and reading" in graduate programme Clinical Neuropsychology (RINO group). Utrecht, the Netherlands.

 

Roelofs, A. "Cumulative computational modeling in cognitive psychology". Validity of Cognitive Models course lecture. Radboud University Nijmegen.

 

Roelofs, A. "De verleiding in actie" [The seduction in action]. Nijmeegse Tweedaagse Kunstmatige Intelligentie, Radboud University Nijmegen.

 

Roelofs, A. "Neural correlates of cognitive control". Brain and Behavior B: Neurophysiology course lecture. Radboud University Nijmegen.

 

Roelofs, A. "Language 2: Production" in graduate programme Clinical Neuropsychology (RINO group). Utrecht, the Netherlands.

 

Roelofs, A. "Doelgericht gedrag" [Goal-directed behavior] in first-year course "Psychologie in actie" [Psychology in action], Radboud University Nijmegen.

2007

Roelofs, A. "Cumulative computational modeling in cognitive psychology". Validity of Cognitive Models course lecture. Radboud University Nijmegen.

 

Roelofs, A. Lecture on "De verleiding in actie" [The seduction in action]. Nijmeegse Tweedaagse Kunstmatige Intelligentie, Radboud University Nijmegen.

 

Roelofs, A. "Attentional networks of the human brain" Undergraduate course lecture "Hersenen en gedrag B: Neurofysiologie" (Brain and behavior B: Neurophysiology), Radboud University Nijmegen.

 

Roelofs, A. Course lectures on "Spoken word production" in Master of Cognitive Neuroscience course "The mental lexicon: Word production, and auditory and visual word recognition", Radboud University Nijmegen.

2008

Roelofs, A. Lecturer on "Neuropsychologie van taal en taalstoornissen" ["Neuropsychology of language and language disorders"] in undergraduate course "Neuropsychologie voor biologen" ["Neuropsychology for biologists"], Radboud University Nijmegen.

 

Roelofs, A. Lecture on "Het aandachtige, lachende, en pratende brein" [The attentive, laughing, and talking brain] in undergraduate (1st year) course "Psychologie in actie" [Psychology in action], Radboud University Nijmegen.

 

Roelofs, A. Tutorial: Modeling of attention to action. Cognitive Science Center Amsterdam summerschool on "Cognitive Modeling: Contrasting perspectives", Amsterdam, the Netherlands.

 

Roelofs, A. Undergraduate (1st year) course "Theoretische psychologie" [Theoretical psychology], Radboud University Nijmegen.

 

Roelofs, A. Course lectures on "Spoken word production" in Master of Cognitive Neuroscience course "The mental lexicon: Word production, and auditory and visual word recognition" (with Dr. James McQueen and Dr. Rob Schreuder), Radboud University Nijmegen.

 

Roelofs, A. Lecturer on "Denken: Aandacht, werkgeheugen, en de frontaalschors" ["Thinking: Attention, working memory, and the frontal cortex" in undergraduate (1st year) course "Psychologie in actie" [Psychology in action], Radboud University Nijmegen.

 

Roelofs, A. Lectures on "Language 1: Perception and reading" and "Language 2: Production" in Dutch national graduate programme Clinical Neuropsychology (RINO group). Utrecht, the Netherlands.

 

Roelofs, A. Lecture on "Attentional networks of the human brain" in undergraduate course "Hersenen en gedrag B: Neurofysiologie" (Brain and behavior B: Neurophysiology), Radboud University Nijmegen.

 

Roelofs, A. Bachelors onderzoekspracticum "Taal en aandacht" [research practical on "Language and attention"] (with Dr. Dorothee Chwilla), Radboud University Nijmegen.

 

Roelofs, A. Course on "Attention and performance" in Master of Cognitive Neuroscience as part of "Perception-Action I: Sensomotor integration" (with Dr. Pascal Fries), Radboud University Nijmegen.

 

 

Calendar

 

 

 

 

 

 

In the media

 

 

 

Interview with A. Roelofs [in Dutch] in VOX Nr. 9, 15 January 2004 (PDF 961 K)

Interview with A. Roelofs in Nijmegen Neuroscience News, Nr. 6, Autumn 2004 (PDF 122 K)

Interview with A. Roelofs [in Dutch] on Dutch Radio Hoe? Zo! Radio 747 AM (May 20, 2005, 13:00-14:00 pm) about how we are able to retrieve so fast just the right words from memory. Available from Teleac for listening via RealPlayer.

Interview with A. Roelofs [in Dutch] in Limburgs Dagblad, 17 August 2005, "Een spraakmakend verhaal".

Interview with A. Roelofs [in Dutch] in VOX magazine, 8 December 2005, "De verleidingen van Ardi Roelofs" [The temptations of Ardi Roelofs] in "De kracht van Max Planck: 25 jaar toponderzoek". (PDF 471 K)

Interview with A. Roelofs [in Dutch] in Radboud Magazine, December 2005, "Het geheim van succesvolle wetenschap".

Interview with E. Aarts [in Dutch] in Explore, nr. 2, April 2007, jaargang 34, "Portret scientist @ work" (PDF 1140 K)

 

Interview with A. Roelofs [in Dutch] in Radboud Magazine, September 2008, "Aandacht als voorwaarde" [Attention as precondition]. (PDF 1174 K)

 

Interview with K. Verhoef [in Dutch] in De Volkskrant, 18 October 2008, "Een schot tussen Nederlands en Engels in je hoofd" [A firewall between Dutch and English in your head]. (PDF 1017K)

 

Interview with E. Aarts [in Dutch] on Belgium Radio 1 VRT "Woord van de dag" (August 20, 2009) about the brain's "Oops area".

 

Interview with E. Aarts [in Dutch] in De Volkskrant, 20 August 2009, "Eerst de taak en dan het ijsje, andersom werkt het echt niet" [First the task, then the icecream, it does not work the other way around]. (PDF 166K)

 

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